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Good write up! I disagree with you about the pockets tho .... the one one the right holds 2 can beverages perfectly and the dry box on the left (750 models) is perfect storage for cell phones, smokes and a small pistol ...lol
Well said....^^^
The review was GREAT!! I thoroughly enjoyed the read!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Yeah, Dixxon Miller (Pohopoco) and Maple Run are closed for "construction"...very convenient. Dixxon Miller is approx. 25 miles from me as well. I like to hit that one when there's some snow to take the bite out of the trails.

DCNR said that they will open them up when the work is completed. That will probably happen just in time for them to close again for hunting season. Realistically, I wouldn't count on riding there until they reopen in December. I hope I'm wrong about that one.
Figures, that's how they always do it. Pretty much do everything to limit us riding


I agree 100% on the noise of the RZR motor......the only enjoyable part of that odd racket is how much sweeter it makes the Kawi v-twin sound!
Hell yeah, agreed 100%!!! I've driven my dad's RZR and climbed back on the Brute only to find myself hammering the gas and letting it pop/burble under engine braking just to hear the exhaust note


Well said....^^^
The review was GREAT!! I thoroughly enjoyed the read!
Thanks! Always appreciate the compliments!
 

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Old thread, first post, and a tinge of negativity... Here we go! :D

Actually, I found your review well-written and to the point. It's very hard to divulge the joys of riding ATVs to the laymen, let alone a Brute Force. My only criticism (and apparently the only criticism given to date) is the muscle car reference, and one muscle car in particular. Given my screen name, it's a safe bet that I am a Mopar guy. The Daytona wasn't based on the Super Bee at all. It was a Charger. The lineage of the first wing car followed the aero war that Dodge and FoMoCo were consumed with in the late 60s. Dodge's Charger, while sleek and sexy on the street, was a dog on the super speedways. The recessed grille and tunneled rear window made it slow. Slow enough that not even the mighty 426 Race Hemi could overcome the drag. The Fords and Mercuries were faster. Dodge engineers spent countless hours in Lockheed's wind tunnel to slick up the Charger, and they did so by adding the grille from a 68 Coronet, some stainless trim to the a-pillars to allow the air to spill off the windshield cleanly, and a flush-mounted rear window so the slipstream would stick to the roof and not tumble. Couple that with some creative reworking of the suspension, and the cars became faster. What resulted was the Charger 500. FoMoCo answered by extending the Torino/Cyclone fenders six inches, lowering and reducing the height of the grille, and reworking a rear bumper into a front bumper to create the Torino Talledega and Mercury Cyclone Spoiler II, respectfully. It worked, and once again, they were faster. Dodge, being headed by people that hated losing at anything, went back to the wind tunnel. They read the NASCAR rule book for what it didn't say this time, and when they emerged, they had come up with a design Buck Rogers would have loved. The styling department hated it, but the execs asked if it would win races. When the engineers said it would, they said build it. From that point on the wing cars dominated. So much so that Richard Petty wanted one. Plymouth said no, so he said goodbye and signed an open-ended contract with Ford. Plymouth freaked out, stuck a pointy nose and a slightly redesigned wing on a Road Runner, and lured King Richard back. Even though they look the same, the Charger Daytona and Road Runner Superbird share no sheetmetal. Remember that 68 Coronet I mentioned? That is what the Super Bee was based on. The Super Bee was an answer for the Plymouth Road Runner; a cheap, quick muscle car that sold like wildfire. The bee reference comes from the car's platform, which was known as the B-body. It was a super car (that's what they called them in the 60s) based on a B-body - Super Bee. So, while the Charger Daytona and the Super Bee were both Dodges, that's where their similarities end. Calling a Daytona a Super Bee does a dis-service to all of those involved in the project to bring one of the wildest cars ever produced to life. Sorry to be a negative Nancy (and for the novel), but accuracy is a virtue. Oh, and don't take this as a jab. I'm just setting you straight.

Here are some pics for everyone's enjoyment. This first one is of a street version of the Charger Daytona, and the second is a Super Bee from its introductory year of 1968.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Old thread, first post, and a tinge of negativity... Here we go! :D

Actually, I found your review well-written and to the point. It's very hard to divulge the joys of riding ATVs to the laymen, let alone a Brute Force. My only criticism (and apparently the only criticism given to date) is the muscle car reference, and one muscle car in particular. Given my screen name, it's a safe bet that I am a Mopar guy. The Daytona wasn't based on the Super Bee at all. It was a Charger. The lineage of the first wing car followed the aero war that Dodge and FoMoCo were consumed with in the late 60s. Dodge's Charger, while sleek and sexy on the street, was a dog on the super speedways. The recessed grille and tunneled rear window made it slow. Slow enough that not even the mighty 426 Race Hemi could overcome the drag. The Fords and Mercuries were faster. Dodge engineers spent countless hours in Lockheed's wind tunnel to slick up the Charger, and they did so by adding the grille from a 68 Coronet, some stainless trim to the a-pillars to allow the air to spill off the windshield cleanly, and a flush-mounted rear window so the slipstream would stick to the roof and not tumble. Couple that with some creative reworking of the suspension, and the cars became faster. What resulted was the Charger 500. FoMoCo answered by extending the Torino/Cyclone fenders six inches, lowering and reducing the height of the grille, and reworking a rear bumper into a front bumper to create the Torino Talledega and Mercury Cyclone Spoiler II, respectfully. It worked, and once again, they were faster. Dodge, being headed by people that hated losing at anything, went back to the wind tunnel. They read the NASCAR rule book for what it didn't say this time, and when they emerged, they had come up with a design Buck Rogers would have loved. The styling department hated it, but the execs asked if it would win races. When the engineers said it would, they said build it. From that point on the wing cars dominated. So much so that Richard Petty wanted one. Plymouth said no, so he said goodbye and signed an open-ended contract with Ford. Plymouth freaked out, stuck a pointy nose and a slightly redesigned wing on a Road Runner, and lured King Richard back. Even though they look the same, the Charger Daytona and Road Runner Superbird share no sheetmetal. Remember that 68 Coronet I mentioned? That is what the Super Bee was based on. The Super Bee was an answer for the Plymouth Road Runner; a cheap, quick muscle car that sold like wildfire. The bee reference comes from the car's platform, which was known as the B-body. It was a super car (that's what they called them in the 60s) based on a B-body - Super Bee. So, while the Charger Daytona and the Super Bee were both Dodges, that's where their similarities end. Calling a Daytona a Super Bee does a dis-service to all of those involved in the project to bring one of the wildest cars ever produced to life. Sorry to be a negative Nancy (and for the novel), but accuracy is a virtue. Oh, and don't take this as a jab. I'm just setting you straight.

Here are some pics for everyone's enjoyment. This first one is of a street version of the Charger Daytona, and the second is a Super Bee from its introductory year of 1968.
69HemiGTX - good stuff! A muscle car lover I am, but fact-obsessed I am not. Honestly wasn't aware of the platform sharing back then (at least, not to the extent that it seems they were), but it's definitely interesting to hear about.

Coincidentally, I just wrote an article about modern muscle cars:
Roody's reviews, thoughts and ramblings: Ten Reasons Muscle Cars Are Here To Stay

Cheers,
Roody
 

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Nice write up.

Ya know, we may be the only lucky ones that fully understand the true meaning of putting a smile on your face. I try to explain it to others, but they just don't get it (because they don't have Brutes).
1 word sums it up the best "orgasmic"...don't care who you are, it's spot on. aka makes you hard lol
 
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