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Discussion Starter #1
My BF has 16 hours since new,in March. I bought it for winter snow removal/plowing. I've been using it this summer for towing around a trailer for debris removal and property maintenance and some trail fun. All fluids have been changed, per svc sched and are at their appropriate levels.
I'm totally baffled by the coarseness of the L-H-N-R shift range when it comes to stopping, changing direction forward and reverse and especially transitioning from Low to High range. That constant grinding of the idler gear when shifting Low to High or Low to Reverse.
I pause and let the engine return to idle rpm before shifting from a full stop.

I'm being told by a Kaw Svc Tech that the bigger displacement ATV's have similar trans issues and that some of this "coarseness will dissipate with time. I'm being told all BF's have this issue, not just mine.

I do have the BF factory svc manual and 4 motorcycles that I regularly maintain but I'm not aware of anything to look for should I disassemble the BF shift mechanism.

Is there anyone who knows of adjustment issues with the shift-selector or any recommendations

Thanks in advance for your help
 

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My BF has 16 hours since new,in March. I bought it for winter snow removal/plowing. I've been using it this summer for towing around a trailer for debris removal and property maintenance and some trail fun. All fluids have been changed, per svc sched and are at their appropriate levels.
I'm totally baffled by the coarseness of the L-H-N-R shift range when it comes to stopping, changing direction forward and reverse and especially transitioning from Low to High range. That constant grinding of the idler gear when shifting Low to High or Low to Reverse.
I pause and let the engine return to idle rpm before shifting from a full stop.

I'm being told by a Kaw Svc Tech that the bigger displacement ATV's have similar trans issues and that some of this "coarseness will dissipate with time. I'm being told all BF's have this issue, not just mine.

I do have the BF factory svc manual and 4 motorcycles that I regularly maintain but I'm not aware of anything to look for should I disassemble the BF shift mechanism.

Is there anyone who knows of adjustment issues with the shift-selector or any recommendations

Thanks in advance for your help
Sounds like the belt's deflection in under the minimum. If you are in neutral the slight friction of the belt on the primary spindle will rotate the secondary and thus the transmission so that when you put it into any other position the gear must stop the moving transmission. This is a normal situation however when the belt is too tight..ie not enough deflection, it raps tighter around that same primary spindle with increased contact which is harder to make slip. This makes it grind much more. Just check the belt's play aka deflection. Although the range is 22-27mm you will want it cold to be not less then 24mm as when it all gets warm and expands that drops...and you don't want it to go below 22mm. While off look for shiny areas on the bottom of the belt. Use a scotchbrite pad to break the shine. Your manual will tell you how to check and set the correct deflection.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks.

I'll check that belt deflection. I understand what you're describing. I rode it on some tech 2-trak, for quite a while in 2 & 4 Low and High and Reverse, just to get some run time on it, break it in further.

A Polaris guy told me that's what I get for buying an import
 

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Don't listen to those Polaris guys, they swear by a company that consistently provides subpar quality control, constantly has recalls, and cheaps out on "wear items" at the factory just to pass increased maintenance and repair costs onto their customers.
 

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My BF has 16 hours since new,in March. I bought it for winter snow removal/plowing. I've been using it this summer for towing around a trailer for debris removal and property maintenance and some trail fun. All fluids have been changed, per svc sched and are at their appropriate levels.
I'm totally baffled by the coarseness of the L-H-N-R shift range when it comes to stopping, changing direction forward and reverse and especially transitioning from Low to High range. That constant grinding of the idler gear when shifting Low to High or Low to Reverse.
I pause and let the engine return to idle rpm before shifting from a full stop.

I'm being told by a Kaw Svc Tech that the bigger displacement ATV's have similar trans issues and that some of this "coarseness will dissipate with time. I'm being told all BF's have this issue, not just mine.

I do have the BF factory svc manual and 4 motorcycles that I regularly maintain but I'm not aware of anything to look for should I disassemble the BF shift mechanism.

Is there anyone who knows of adjustment issues with the shift-selector or any recommendations

Thanks in advance for your help
I bought a 2019 and had the same problem. I took into the shop and they said the Kawasaki was aware of the issue. They replaced the throttle body (if I remember correctly) and it fixed the problem. Apparently they have had problems with this. I actually had to take it in twice before it was fixed, the first time I think they adjusted the idle but it did not help. You might have to be more persistent because the Kawasaki rep that my shop talked to knew about this problem. Your machine should not be doing this!
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks much!
I bought a 2019 and had the same problem. I took into the shop and they said the Kawasaki was aware of the issue. They replaced the throttle body (if I remember correctly) and it fixed the problem. Apparently they have had problems with this. I actually had to take it in twice before it was fixed, the first time I think they adjusted the idle but it did not help. You might have to be more persistent because the Kawasaki rep that my shop talked to knew about this problem. Your machine should not be doing this!
Thanks for the input. Tomorrow will be a good workout as we have about 14" of September 8 snow here in CO.
I'm going to ask the svc tech about what you've described.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I bought a 2019 and had the same problem. I took into the shop and they said the Kawasaki was aware of the issue. They replaced the throttle body (if I remember correctly) and it fixed the problem. Apparently they have had problems with this. I actually had to take it in twice before it was fixed, the first time I think they adjusted the idle but it did not help. You might have to be more persistent because the Kawasaki rep that my shop talked to knew about this problem. Your machine should not be doing this!
As a follow-up, I talked with my dealer, again, citing your experience and he called KAW Tech support.
There is an issue with the "idle air-bleed" adjustment on the throttle body and it could involve replacing an internal, throttle body o-ring or replacing the entire throttle body.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like the belt's deflection in under the minimum. If you are in neutral the slight friction of the belt on the primary spindle will rotate the secondary and thus the transmission so that when you put it into any other position the gear must stop the moving transmission. This is a normal situation however when the belt is too tight..ie not enough deflection, it raps tighter around that same primary spindle with increased contact which is harder to make slip. This makes it grind much more. Just check the belt's play aka deflection. Although the range is 22-27mm you will want it cold to be not less then 24mm as when it all gets warm and expands that drops...and you don't want it to go below 22mm. While off look for shiny areas on the bottom of the belt. Use a scotchbrite pad to break the shine. Your manual will tell you how to check and set the correct deflection.
I have asked about this belt deflection with my dealer and I'm going to check this first before I drive 300 miles to have the throttle body. This deflection does sound like it could be the cause.
We received 17" of snow yesterday and I used my BF to plow the wet, heavy snow. When I drove forward, pushing a lot of snow against the blade and let that force stop the forward motion, the shifting was easy, flawless, low to reverse and reverse to low.

I'll post the result
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
EPILOG Sept 24, 2020

It is repaired by the dealer, under warranty, and it shifts much, much better than it did. Like new should be!

According to Kawasaki, my rough shift issue is due to high idle speed, common at high elevations. I live at 9000'.
To lower idle speed, turn idle/air screw inward all the way to stop (1 screw per throttle valve) and barely crack it open.
Kaw doesn't provide a physical idle adjustment. That speed is controlled by the ECM. This idle/air screw is a work-around to lower the speed. It's part of the secondary air sys, SAS. I didn't know this BF has a SAS. Thanks California!

Kaw also said another cause, in some cases, not all, is "a bad o-ring in the ISC valve".

I went through some bs trying to get this fixed. Three, separate dealers, one common story "Let it break in!"

Motivationteam nailed it! I was persistent!

Thanks again for everybody's input
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sawatch Range in Colorado
Home of the 14'ers
 
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